Learn the road and know your carpool

November 30, 2008 Marketing Comments (0) 112

In recent months, I have encountered a number of people who are new to their jobs. They’ve come from outside the organization for which they now work, and they were hired in part because of the good work they had done with their former companies. No doubt, they were told when they were hired something like, “What we’re doing isn’t working, we need you to fix it.” The new organization has handed each the keys to the car and is relying on past navigational experiences of this new “driver” to get the firm to a new destination. Unfortunately for the driver, the map he posses is now outdated; there are roadblocks and detours all around. The destination may be the same, but the road has changed, and so have the people in the carpool. This will be a very different trip.
As an experienced change agent, I can offer one simple piece of advice:

Learn the road and know the people in your carpool. The road you traveled before will not deliver the same results this time.

In other words, organizational context matters. It is important to understand “why” the organization operates the way it does help to provide the foundation for change. This knowledge gives value to people who may have been successfully using these processes and procedures to achieve the current state of operation; it provides a better map by highlighting the roadblocks and allows you to plan the detours.

The new hire is brought on board for fresh thinking. “New” will only get you so far, though. Fresh thinking, combined with a thorough knowledge of the organization’s culture, processes, and procedures provides the credibility necessary to facilitate change. Otherwise, the new hire becomes just another presumably arrogant person who begins every story with, “When I was at (insert previous company here), we did it “this way.”

Trust me. Nobody wants to be “that guy.”

David Harkins is a serial entrepreneur, which is a more professional way of saying he is still trying to figure out what he wants to be when he grows up.
When not working for himself, he has had a fulfilling career in marketing, advising both large and small companies including several in the Fortune 500 and many of America’s largest nonprofit organizations. In his spare time, he consults, speaks, writes, hikes, explores, and creates art. Although, not necessarily in that order. Connect with him on social media below:

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Learn the road and know your carpool

by David Harkins time to read: 1 min
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