Interview: Lynda Liner on Entrepreneurial Recruiting

October 1, 2018 ENT600 - Entrepreneurial Planning, Interviews Comments (0) 886

The following is an interview with Lynda Liner, Senior Executive Recruiter with Victoria James Executive Search, for my Entrepreneurial Planning graduate course. Lynda and I have known each other since 2015 when she recruited me for a position in a small business. We discuss entrepreneurial recruitment for A-Players.

Q. Please share with me a little about your background and experience recruiting.

A. Thank you, David, for the invitation to share insights into the recruiting industry.

My early introduction to recruiting was joining a well-known international retained executive search firm as Assistant to the Administrative group that allowed me to learn the industry literally from the bottom up and benefitting from support from mentors while advancing and working each layer of recruiting: research, strategy, candidate development, interviewing, client management – total experience and education in Best Practices and Values I continue to apply today. The CEO of the recruiting firm gave me advice I’ve never forgotten, “Always remember, recruiting is a contact sport.

Things happen when you engage with people.”  And has influenced my dedication to the best possible experience and service to our clients and our candidate professionals.

Q. Your areas of expertise, as I understand it, are in the sales and marketing disciplines. In your experience, how important is it that entrepreneurs find the right talent for roles in these disciplines in a startup? Why do you believe this to be true?

A. The “right” sales and marketing talent will ultimately be responsible for the forward success of an organization. A start-up would initially focus on sales and marketing as the backbone and frontline of an organization and primary management partnership to establish a solid foundation on which to build the organization’s mission, philosophy, culture and simultaneously developing a strategy and action plan for their product or service.

To confirm the importance of identifying the right talent for sales and marketing, in my experience, having placed numerous marketing professionals in middle to senior management roles, I’ve observed large and small companies, from start-up and established, realize positive outcomes, e.g., increased revenue, brand awareness, acquisition, other - as a result of successful key position placements.

Most recently, we placed a Vice President of Marketing with an online business service company that has enjoyed moderate success for ten years without any dedicated sales or marketing presence. We worked with the CEO/Founder in a consultative capacity to translate his thoughts and ideas into a position overview/job description incorporating long and short-term goals, objectives, expectations, experience/skills/attributes for their highly critical hire who will be responsible for tripling revenue, analyzing product, website and brand, budget, and every marketing touch point. After a select number of candidates, numerous one-on-one meetings, within three months we found their ideal Vice President. All parties are pleased and looking forward to an amazing future.

Q. What is your process for finding those A-Players that entrepreneurs need to build and grow their business?

A. Relentless, hard work! Not kidding.

Although in today’s technology environment, everything is possible and the information is immediately available. Staying current with resourcing tools, applications, and platforms is critical. We also manage a growing in-house community of marketing professionals. We have an open registry and approximately 20,000 profiles that are regularly updated so we are in constant communication with our sales/marketing population by email, blog, social media, website postings. In addition to internal resources, we use outside resources where applicable such as LinkedIn. Our firm specializes in all things under the marketing umbrella from traditional to digital and all things about to be new. When a client seeks our recruiting experience, it requires the knowledge of all aspects of marketing functions to better serve both client and candidate.

In general, recruiting relies on those skills at the core of experience: sourcing, relationships, influence, resilience. In an evolving world, recruiters must be social media savvy and technically proficient as the hiring process becomes more and more complex.

Q. What are the top things an entrepreneur or startup founder should look for when hiring a recruiter?

A. Trite but true, great recruiters have a passion for their craft.

They have a Consultant Approach. Great recruiters take a consultant and partner approach to supporting a client and filling an important position whether a manager or CEO. The more a recruiter asks for information and details the more they bond with a client and know the position, the better prepared he/she will be to represent your company to the target audience and act as your brand ambassador.

They are outstanding communicators. Working in the “human resource” business requires a recruiter to be a great communicator, no matter whether face to face, on the phone or via email.

Listening is a skill. A great recruiter is an excellent listener who is respectful, diplomatic, empathetic, professional. Listening for what isn’t communicated is also a skill and is acquired through experience.

Q. In your opinion, what are a few of the bigger mistakes entrepreneurs or startup founders make in recruiting?

A. In advance of hiring, failing to take quality time to thoroughly evaluate: company vision, company direction, company goals, and objectives.

Communicate exactly what is expected of the position and how the position will interact with the management team and or senior management.

Communicate the position’s authority and decision-making.

Communicate how the position interacts with the founder(s), if applicable.

Q. What’s the best advice would you give an entrepreneur about finding and hiring an A-Player for his or her business?

A. First employees are critical. Don’t rush the process.

Allow plenty of time to recruit the best possible talent that fulfills your requirements and expectations.

Avoid disorganized hiring practices. Establish a reliable process for sourcing, recruiting, hiring, and onboarding.

Look for previous startup experience or comparable business growth experience.

Identify marketing strengths depending on the position:
analytics, marketing automation, strategy, etc.

Measure previous career accomplishments. Do they align with
position expectations.

David Harkins is a serial entrepreneur with significant experience in branding, strategy, licensing and marketing.

In his spare time, he consults, coaches, speaks, writes, hikes, explores, and creates art. Although, not necessarily in that order.

Connect with him on social media below:

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Interview: Jim Mitchem on Entrepreneurship

May 8, 2018 Interviews Comments (0) 921

Jim Mitchem, an author and partner with branding firm Out of the Ether, and I explore starting a service business, the willingness to take risks, branding, continuous self-improvement, and many other things in this interview for my Everyday Entrepreneurs podcast.

 

You can listen below on Soundcloud or subscribe to the podcast on iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.

David Harkins is a serial entrepreneur with significant experience in branding, strategy, licensing and marketing.

In his spare time, he consults, coaches, speaks, writes, hikes, explores, and creates art. Although, not necessarily in that order.

Connect with him on social media below:

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Interview: ClassB CEO Eric Hilferding on Entrepreneurship

March 8, 2018 ENT670 – Adv. Entrepreneurial Strategy, Graduate Program Coursework, Interviews Comments (0) 549

The following is an interview with Eric Hilferding, CEO of ClassB, a custom t-shirt manufacturer, and printer for my graduate coursework in entrepreneurship. Eric and I first met in 2005 when I was with the Boy Scouts of America. His company was one of the BSA's first licensees in the revamped licensing program. We became fast friends and I have long admired his attention to detail, his creativity, and his commitment to service.  

 

Eric Hilferding of ClassBQ. Tell me a little about ClassB and your role with the company.

A. ClassB is a provider of custom decorated goods including t-shirts, embroidery and promotional products to primarily nonprofit organizations. The company started in 1982. We currently have 38 full-time employees. We focus on having a great customer experience. The internal motto is we sell service not t-shirts. I am the CEO of ClassB and one of the two company founders back in 1982. I have been formally running the company since the mid 1990’s.

Q. Did you have any entrepreneurial experience or education before launching the company?

A. I have zero business or entrepreneurial education - I have a BA in History. Luckily, learning about running a business was always a part of my life. I started working at around age 8 at my grandfather's lumber yard. My parents often discussed business at the dinner table.

When my mother and I started ClassB, all immediate family members eventually were employed. I read profusely to fill gaps in my knowledge. I was very lucky to have my father with his extensive business knowledge available at all times. Without his experience, I would have failed many times over. Now I realize how right he was on everything.

Another key area is my Boy Scout experience. I learned so much by making lots of leadership mistakes in my Troop and working at Summer Camp. Having that sandbox to learn is one of the most valuable things I can imagine. If not for my parents and the Boy Scouts, my only business reference point would be work based sitcoms.

Q. What are you most passionate about and how does it tie to your work each day?

A. My main passion is that we treat customers right. It's probably some of the Boy Scout indoctrination. However, most of it is driven by a sense of perfection and trying to avoid the guilt of an unhappy customer. I obsess over a bad customer experience and have to process thru it to be able to move on. I get lots of satisfaction by improving things. I lose interest if things stagnate or a task becomes repetitive and no longer optimizable. The idea of constant iterative change and the occasional disruption suits me. I also enjoy the new things I have to figure out. On some days I’m a scientist, engineer, investigator, lawyer, judge or a plumber, etc. It’s never the same every day.

Q. Business owners have many responsibilities during the day. Some of those responsibilities are more challenging than others. What are a few of the things you find to be the hardest to do? What are some of the easiest? Moreover, why are these things easy or hard for you?

A. The hardest thing for me is finding uninterrupted time. Every day being different is great - having so much to do is a problem. I have lost weeks just trying to finish something in 30 min increments. Kind of related: the most challenging thing for me is finding good people - they make all the difference. I have learned to hire people that fill my weaknesses not people who are like me.

I can’t tell if someone is a good fit in an interview. I have to hire them and then decide in 2 weeks at most so I can circle back to my 2nd option. The destruction to customers, profitability, and other employees that a single person who is “not a good fit for the job” can bring is incredible. As long as I remember that, firing people is easy. If I forget, firing is a drawn out, expensive, painful to all parties process - especially me. The easy stuff is fixing systems and things - why because I’m a systems guy, not a people person.

Q. As an entrepreneur, there are all kinds of things that can affect the business. We could spend all day, every day, worrying about those things. What are some of the things that “keep you up at night?” And what do you do each day to mitigate those worries?

A. I worry a lot - to the point of being unhealthy. I have a terrible fear of not doing things correctly - still a Boy Scout in some ways. I always strive to go above and beyond. I always play things straight - I assume that everything will always be discovered at some point - so it should be done in a way that would be correct from the get-go.

My biggest fears are someone taking advantage of us. This comes in two forms - frivolous lawsuits and unfairly instituted/ enforced regulations. I have seen a few ridiculous claims - I have a good family lawyer to pass them off. I also worry that someday an employee here makes a small mistake that destroys the company, puts all my employees out of work, and puts me in bankruptcy.

Many regulations often require academic-like responses, seem punitive, or meant for an unspecified situation—they are a time and soul killer. My fear comes in because they often seem to be unfairly applied. Unfortunately, you never know for sure how to comply or if the rule is real. You have to wait time to have an idea. It’s the uncertainty that gets me. The personal interpretation of a regulation by a single inspector has been devastating in time and money.

I mitigate these two things by trying not to think of them. I do all I can to do the right thing anyway and just hope.

Q. How do you motivate yourself each day? What do you do to let off steam?

A. Motivating is easy for me - I’ve worked all my life, so has everyone in my family. I’m a workaholic for sure. When things become overwhelming as they often do, I just have to remember to ignore the 100 things going on and move one thing forward at a time. Eventually, I can work out of the mess. I wish I could say being a business owner is glamorous - clearly, I’m doing it wrong, but my 'letting off steam' is maybe two days a year where I get to go hiking in the desert with not a soul in sight for miles.

Q. What’s your favorite customer story from your business?

A. For owners and managers, you really only hear the problems. It’s great you ask this question because it's important not to lose sight of the daily things that go right. Ninety-eight percent of the time, things go good or perfect. The customer service people at ClassB get to hear all the good stories. I encourage them to share with everyone. We have the entire wall of the customer service area with photos and experiences that customers have shared with us.

I think my favorite situations are when we go out of our way big time to get the customer their shirts in time for an event that has special meaning for them. We have turned out shirts in a day and overnighted them because the customer made a mistake and we wanted to make it right for them. The best customer experiences come from looking for the customers best interests and ignoring the effect on any single transaction. Bake in some money to your price to be able to treat them the way you wish things worked.

Q. In your experience, what have you found works best to motivate employees?

A. Wow, have I worked the gamut on that! The one thing I have learned the hard way is don’t listen to what they say will motivate them. Money, benefits, and perks only work in certain market conditions or individual situations and are secondary or even a counter to the true motivator. The number one motivator is good managers. Those managers have to have people skills. They have to make the work environment-friendly, positive, professional, productive, fun and fair. They have to respect all the
employees by having their fellow employees have a purpose and contribute to the team.

All managers have to pull their weight and show appreciation for everyone's efforts. They also have to hold a high standard. If all that is in place - employees will be close to self-motivated and not look to leave. They are more productive, and guess what: Now those managers worth more, and they get more money. Try to work it backward, and it does not work at all. I personally am a horrible motivator - I am lucky that I have managers that are really good at that.

Q. Entrepreneurs are risk-takers. We know there’s a probably a more significant chance for failure than for success. Still, we move forward. As you think about your entrepreneurial plans, what is your worst-case scenario? What makes that the “worst” for you?

A. I always view the current situation as transitory. What is working today will not at some point. All I can do is keep moving and try my best to adjust.

I think my worst case scenario is that I get so caught up in the day to day issues of running my business that I lose the big view of where the market is going, and we fall behind. Know this always happening to an extent. I don’t want to fail my family or employees because of something I missed. I don’t want to look back after the failure and realize I spent too much time on ABC instead of XYZ.

There is a burden in having so many people and their families relying on you for their lively hood. I have maybe 60-100 people indirectly or directly relying on me. I do not want to fail them. If it was just me, failure is easy and guilt-free - plus the Boy Scouts taught me how to survive in the woods if need be.

David Harkins is a serial entrepreneur with significant experience in branding, strategy, licensing and marketing.

In his spare time, he consults, coaches, speaks, writes, hikes, explores, and creates art. Although, not necessarily in that order.

Connect with him on social media below:

Continue Reading