Magazine Ad Analysis

The following is a review of five selected magazine advertisements. Some of the advertisements have been chosen from award-winning ads located in the archives of adsoftheworld.com. Click on each ad link below or scroll down to review the analysis of each ad. If you desire to review the advertisement more closely, click on the ad image itself to see a larger version.

Advertisement 1: Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar, It Sells Itself

Advertisement 2: Goodwill, Belt

Advertisement 3: Mercedes, Good night, Boss

Advertisement 4: On the Job, Concrete

Advertisement 5: Vanish-Ink, Mr. Roarke

 

Advertisement 1: Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar, 2016

 “It Sells Itself

About the Advertisement:

The magazine ad for Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar is copy-heavy with a few illustrations. It might be considered a throw-back advertisement to another time when printing pictures or color advertisements were quite costly. The ad copy humorously explores why Bragg would need to advertise its best-selling product and in doing so explores the virtues of that product. This ad is one in a campaign.

The advertisement engages the curiosity of reader with the headline to capture attention, and then uses humor to deliver the message the quality of its product.

Objective:

The purpose of the ad appears to be to educate consumers about the quality of the product, making sure to highlight its “organic” feature, and has an end goal of increasing sales and gaining market share. Since Bragg is a private company, it is unknown as to whether these advertisements are effective.

Target Market:

The target market is unclear, but it appears to be those consumers who already buy apple cider considering how it calls itself out as making “way better apple cider than the other guys….We can’t really think of an other guy.”

Call to Action:

The call to action is subtle, but it is to buy Bragg.

Value Proposition:

We’ve been organic and healthy for over 100 years. We withstood the test of time, and you will find no better apple cider on the market.

Advertisement 2: Goodwill, 2016

 “Belt

About the Advertisement:

Belt is part of a multi-media campaign from Goodwill and the Ad Council. The ad shows tiny construction workers “working” on a pants belt as if it were a road. A pair of blue jeans and the belt buckle are showing in the background to help the reader establish the scale of the construction workers. It carries the logo for Goodwill and the Ad Council, along with the tagline “Donate Stuff. Create Jobs along with the URL goodwill.org.

The advertisement triggers the curiosity of the reader and then engages emotion and an altruism motivation.

Objective:

The ad and campaign’s goal is to encourage readers to donate items. On an emotional level, the ad helps the reader connect with the idea that it’s not only corporations that create jobs and that the reader through the simple act of donating an unwanted, everyday item, can contribute to creating jobs for others. This is a powerful and motivating message because most everyone has something that could be donated to Goodwill.

The ad and campaign were launched in December 2016 and Goodwill have not yet publicly reported any statistics of donations for comparison to prior years. However, in 2015 the organization stated that it employed and provided community services for more than 89 million people and placed more than 318,000 individuals in employment (Goodwill Staff, 2015).

Target Market:

The target market for the ad is broad, as virtually anyone with an unused piece of clothing, household appliance, tool or other items can donate it to Goodwill. The target of the ad may be better defined by the publication in which it appears, but it is likely that the ad focus on those who have higher levels of disposable income.

Call to Action:

The call to action is to donate unused items to Goodwill.

Value Proposition:

You, too, can create jobs. Goodwill turns your donations into jobs and helps put people to work, which not only helps those less fortunate, but it also helps the economy.

Advertisement 3: Mercedes, 2010

 “Good night, Boss

About the Advertisement:

This ad for Mercedes-Benz is a tribute ad to George Steinbrenner, the principal owner of the New York Yankees. Mr. Steinbrenner, whose hands-on management style earned him the nickname “The Boss,” often wore the aviator-style sunglasses shown in the advertisement. Presumably, he was a fan of Mercedes-Benz automobiles. The ad shows those trademark sunglasses and carries the headline, “Good night, Boss,” along with Mr. Steinbrenner’s birth and death dates, and the Mercedes-Benz logo.

The advertisement evokes emotion for Steinbrenner’s life and legacy with the New York Yankees.

Objective:

That ad’s key objective is to pay homage to Steinbrenner in his passing. Although, it is also an identity association and brand-building ad for the Mercedes. Whether Steinbrenner was the owner of a Mercedes or not, by his ownership of the New York Yankees it is assumed he was wealthy. Mercedes creates an association between its brand and Steinbrenner through that wealth.

Tribute ads like this one are risky for a brand, and the effectiveness is difficult to measure. Steinbrenner might have had a strong association with Mercedes making the advertisement fitting with his passing, yet some may see the ad as exploitive.

Target Market:

The ad’s target market is primarily upper-middle class and upper-class fans of the New York Yankees and George Steinbrenner. Its secondary market is likely to be upper-middle class and upper-class baseball fans.

Call to Action:

This ad does not have a call to action. It is purely brand building.

Value Proposition:

Here’s to George Steinbrenner. He was in a class all of his own. And so is Mercedes-Benz.

Advertisement 4: On The Job, 2009

 “Concrete

About the Advertisement:

Concrete is an ad for On The Job hand lotion is one of three in a campaign showing the hands of tradesmen at work. The black and white ad features a pair of hands laying what appears to be a cinderblock foundation. The texture of the skin on the hands is rough and in many places cracked and broken.

The only color showing in the ad is a depiction of the On the Job hand lotion in the lower right corner, accompanying the tagline: “Repairs hands that work for a living.”

Objective:

The ad’s goal it to increase sales of its product. The ads effectiveness is unknown. Additional information is not determinable as there is little information available about its manufacturer, Wharton Innovative Products, in online searches.

Target Market:

Because of its imagery, the primary target market for this ad appears to be male masons or similar tradesmen whose hands take a beating while working with rough materials such as concrete, brick, or stone. A secondary market would be all male tradesman or home handymen who have rough hands. A tertiary market could be the spouse or significant other of a tradesman.

Call to Action:

The call to action is suggestive rather than direct. It suggests purchasing the hand lotion.

Value Proposition:

Those men who work for a living deserve softer hands, too. And so do their wives, partners, significant others, children, and grandchildren.

Advertisement 5: Vanish-Ink, 2008

 “Mr. Roarke

About the Advertisement:

Mr. Roarke is an ad for Vanish-Ink, a Charlotte, NC Tattoo removal company. It features a photography of Ricardo Montalban in character as Mr. Roarke from the 1970’s television show, Fantasy Island. In the show, Mr. Roarke and his sidekick, Tattoo, great arriving guests at the beginning of the show and see them off at the end of the show. The photograph used in the ad depicts one of those moments, showing only Mr. Roark and not his sidekick. In place of his sidekick, Tattoo is the logo for Vanish-Ink.

This advertisement evokes humor from the reader.

Objective:

The aim of this ad shows readers how easy it is to make a tattoo disappear. The goal is to increase sales.

Target Market:

The target market is tattooed children and young adults of the 1970’s who were fans of the television show, Fantasy Island, or those from the same era who have sufficient knowledge of pop culture to identify with the advertisement.

Call to Action:

The call to action is for the reader is to contact Vanish-Ink, presuming the reader has a tattoo that he or she wants to eliminate. Like the newsprint advertisement reviewed last week, the company virtually hides it website URL and does not provide a telephone number.

Value Proposition:

It’s not fantasy. We can make tattoos vanish.

Featured  Image Source: Getty Images, Thurston Hopkins

 

References:

Goodwill Staff (2015, May). About Goodwill Industries®. Fact Sheet. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from goodwill.org: http://www.goodwill.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/About-Goodwill-updated-May-2015-FINAL.pdf

Newspaper Ad Analysis

The following is a review of five selected newspaper advertisements. Some of the advertisements have been chosen from award-winning ads located in the archives of the adfourm.com, while others were selected from adsoftheworld.com. Click on each ad link below or scroll down to review the analysis of each ad. If you desire to review the advertisement more closely, click on the ad image itself to see a larger version.

Advertisement 1: Reborn to be Alive, Save 8 Lives

Advertisement 2: Reporters without Borders, Newspaper Sticks

Advertisement 3: HBO, Dragon Shadow

Advertisement 4: Newspaper Association of America, How to Create a Newspaper Ad by Lee Clow

Advertisement 5:  Precision Laser Tattoo Removal, Kitty

 

Advertisement 1: Reborn to be Alive, 2008

 “Save 8 Lives

About the Advertisement:

The newspaper advertisement for the Belgium organ donor registry, Reborn to be Alive, features an obituary page of a newspaper with spaces for nine obituaries. However, only one obituary shows on the page. Eight empty spaces for other obituaries accompany the lone obituary.

The advertisement stimulates the curiosity of the reader to encourage continued review of the ad. It further creates an altruistic appeal to the reader to do something useful and helpful to others.

Objective:

The purpose of the advertisement is to call attention to the fact that one organ donor can save eight lives. The visual use of white space on the obituary page does two things: First, it calls attention to the lone obituary at the center of the page and evokes curiosity of the reader. Second, it suggests that the individual in the obituary listed was an organ donor, and further suggests that the donor saved eight lives and eliminated the need for eight accompanying obituaries.

The key goal is to increase organ donation. While specifics about the effectiveness of the advertisement are uncertain the European Union, of which Belgium is a member, did see an 18% increase in deceased organ donation between 2004 and 2013 (European Commission Staff, 2014). Belgium is also one of the top European Union Countries for organ donations (European Commission Staff).

Target Market:

The target market is likely to be older individuals who are more prone to read the obituary page of the newspaper. Although, the ad will probably pique the curiosity of any reader who comes across it.

Call to Action:

The call to action is to register with the directory and to donate your organs after death.

Value Proposition:

Make a difference in the world. Organ donors save lives.

Advertisement 2: Reporters without Borders, 2014

 “Newspaper Sticks

About the Advertisement:

Newspaper Sticks is a campaign of four advertisements (one advertisement in the campaign is featured above) for the organization Reporters without Borders. Each of the advertisements shows an image of a newspaper on a filing “stick” as might be seen in a library. An individual, presumably a reporter, whose hands are over his or her head and crossed at the stick to suggest the individual is least handcuffed, or at worst tortured. In the advertisement above for the German market, the writing on the newspaper stick tells the reader, “In many countries, journalists risk torture and oppression for the sake of the truth.”

The advertisement triggers the emotions of the reader out of concern for the safety of journalists.

Objective:

The goal of the ad makes the reading public aware of the risk to journalists in countries where free speech may not be protected. A secondary goal is to solicit donations in support of the organization, its mission for freedom of information, and the services it offers to journalists.

It is unclear as to whether the campaign was effective in achieving its donation goal; however, it is effective in delivering the message that the lives of journalists may be at risk.

Target Market:

Given that it does not appear the advertisement appeared in American newspapers, the target market for this ad is presumed to be those living in countries where the concern with the suppression of objective and accurate information is high. Although the target market is not clear, the audience is likely to be over age 50 based on Pew Research Center Statistics on readership (Pew Research Center Staff, 2016). While Pew Research Center data relies on American readership, further research points to similar declines in younger readers of German newspapers, which would support the older reader as the target for this advertising campaign (Schnibben, C., 2013).

Call to Action:

The call to action is to donate now to support freedom of information and potentially save the life of a journalist.

Value Proposition:

Accurate information about the happenings around the world is critical for the well-being of us all. You will not get objective and correct information if journalists are persecuted.

Advertisement 3: HBO, 2013

 “Dragon Shadow

About the Advertisement:

Dragon Shadow is part of a multi-media campaign for the third season of HBO’s Game of Thrones series. The print advertisement depicts a shadow of a flying dragon in the center of the newspaper spread as if to suggest to the reader that a dragon might be flying overhead as the reader turns the page. The promotional language for the show is located in the lower right corner of the page, which is where the reader will likely look as he or she grabs the page to turn it.

The advertisement utilizes surprise (as the reader turns the page and sees the dragon) and anticipation to engage the reader.

Objective:

The goal of the ad is to fuel anticipation for the coming season of the show Game of Thrones amongst current HBO subscribers, and perhaps encourage the purchase of an HBO subscription for non-subscribers to watch the show.

HBO’s campaign seems to have been effective as the third season premiere episode attracted 4.4 million viewers, up 13% from the season two premiere (Patton, 2013).

Target Market:

The ad’s target market is current fans of the television series and possibly readers of the George R. R. Martin books of the same name.

Call to Action:

Don’t miss the season premiere of season three on March 31.

Value Proposition:

Grown dragons will be a big part of season three.

Advertisement 4: Newspaper Association of America, 2002

 “How to Create A Newspaper Ad by Lee Clow

 

About the Advertisement:

This advertisement by the Newspaper Association of America was one of a series created for the organization by renowned “ad men” to extol the virtue of effective newspaper advertising. The advertisements were made available to all association members including the New York Times, who ran the accompanying ad.

This ad by Lee Clow tells the reader that newspapers are daily occurrences; therefore, a “special medium” with a sense of urgency. Advertisements, then, must “demand attention.” The most effective ads, according to Clow in the advertisement, incorporate a picture of some sort to grab attention, and then a few words that create a story to engage the audience’s intelligence, humor, and curiosity. The ad, says Clow, must be “smart and interesting.”

The advertisement, which incorporates a hand-drawn, Picasso-like illustration, and hand-written text engages the reader’s curiosity because it’s so different than the printed words and photographs typically found in the newspaper.

Objective:

The purpose of the advertisement appears to be to help newspapers who are members of the Newspaper Association of America court advertisers in their markets, thereby increasing advertising revenue.

With newspaper readership declining it is likely that only advertisers attempting to reach certain demographic groups would find newspaper advertising appealing (Pew Research Center Staff, 2016). However, when this ad ran in 2002, newspaper advertisement was higher and such advertising might have been more effective.

Target Market:

The target market for this ad is business owners, marketers, and advertising professionals who are readers of the newspaper. It makes the assumption that business owners and marketers who are reading the paper will also have customers likely to read the newspaper; however, this may not necessarily be true.

Call to Action:

The call to action is passive and somewhat indirect. Although the call seems to be to “advertise in this newspaper.”

Value Proposition:

Advertisers can benefit from the credibility and intimacy created by newspapers by association.

Advertisement 5: Precision Laser Tattoo Removal, 2011

 “Kitty

About the Advertisement:

Kitty is one of three advertisements in a campaign for Precision Laser Tattoo Removal of Canada. The advertisement shows a tattoo of a white kitten with a bow on its head and a couple of flowers. The tattoo is at at the waistline of, presumably, a female. The kitten has a red laser dot on its forehead to seemingly indicate it is being marked for removal.  The red laser dot is reminiscent of the dots we often see in movies when a sniper has targeted an individual for “removal.”

This advertisement plays to the emotion of regret.

Objective:

The aim of this ad is to remind readers that tattoos no longer have to be permanent and encourage a call to Precision Laser Tattoo Removal. The goal is to increase sales.

Target Market:

The apparent age of the individual in the photo might suggest the target audience is likely to be younger. Although, anyone with a tattoo could be in the target market.

Call to Action:

The call to action is for the reader is to contact Precision Laser Tattoo Removal if the reader has a tattoo that he or she wants to be eliminated. The company makes the call to action difficult because there is no phone number and the reader has to search for the website address (Hint: It’s at the top of the ad).

Value Proposition:

You don’t have to live with your regrets for the rest of your life.

Featured  Image Source: Getty Images, Lyle Leduc

 

References:

European Commission Staff (2014, November 26). Recent Facts and Figures. Journalist Workshop on Organ donation and transplantation. Retrieved April 7, 2017, from europa.eu: http://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/blood_tissues_organs/docs/ev_20141126_factsfigures_en.pdf

Patton, D. (2013, April 1). ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 3 Premiere Hits Viewership High. Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved April 9, 2017, from deadline.com: http://deadline.com/2013/04/game-of-thrones-ratings-season-3-premiere-hbo-465004/

Pew Research Center Staff (2016). Newspapers: Daily Readership by Age. Retrieved April 7, 2017, from journalism.org: http://www.journalism.org/media-indicators/newspapers-daily-readership-by-age/

Schnibben, C. (2013, August 13). Newspaper Crisis Hits Germany. Speigel Online. Retrieved April 7, 2017, from spiegel.de: http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/circulation-declines-hit-german-papers-a-decade-after-america-a-915574.html

 

Television Ad Analysis

The following is a review of five selected television advertisements. Each advertisement has been chosen from Advertising Educational Foundation’s Ad Award Archives. Click on each ad link below or scroll down to review the analysis of each ad.

Advertisement 1: Luvs, Second Time Mom’s and the Truth About Parenting

Advertisement 2: Ford, Wedding

Advertisement 3: North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund, This is Destini

Advertisement 4: Visit Florida, Aspirations

Advertisement 5:  Wells Fargo, Why I Work

 

Advertisement 1: Luvs, 2013

 “Second Time Moms and the Truth about Parenting

About the Advertisement:

This 30-second television visually contrasts the actions of a first-time mom whose baby drops its pacifier with the second-time mom whose baby whose baby drops its pacifier. The commercial suggests that the first-time mom is highly over protective and concerned, while the second-time mom takes everything in stride.

The advertisement evokes humor that easily connects with those who have more than one child.

Objective:

The aim of the ad is to make a connection between Luvs and the comfort experienced moms have with the product. By demonstrating the overprotective nature of the first-time mom and contrasting it with the more practical nature of the second-time mom, Luvs desires to suggest that first-time moms should head the “advice” of those more experienced and purchase their products as well.

The key goal is to increase product sales.

Target Market:

The primary target market for this product appears to be a first-time mom, but arguably it is also parents with any number of children.

Call to Action:

The response objective is sales; therefore, the call to action is the tag, “Live, Learn, get Luvs.” This is to encourage new parents to make a purchase

Value Proposition:

Luvs makes a product that is trusted by experienced moms.

Advertisement 2: Ford, 2011

 “Wedding

About the Advertisement:

The 60-second spot begins with a staid African American wedding that’s crashed by comedian Kevin Hart driving a brand new 2011 Ford Explorer. Hart’s character extols the virtues of the features (roominess, turn, power) and technology of the vehicle. Using the wedding and the wedding party as the background, Ford leverages Hart’s humor to make an emotional connection and add to some energy to an otherwise uncharacteristically solemn environment.

Objective:

It appears the goal of the spot is to increase visibility and ultimately sales of its product among African American families, as well as perhaps other racial and ethnic groups.

Target Market:

Given the casting and wedding environment, the target market seems to be upscale African American families–those just starting a family as well as those with established families–who might benefit from a roomier, all-purpose SUV.

Call to Action:

The call to action is a somewhat unclear, but presumably is “get yours now,” as evidenced by the bride and groom driving off in the vehicle with Hart running behind screaming, “Hey! That’s not yours!”

Value Proposition:

The new 2011 Ford Explorer has utility and value for everyone.

Advertisement 3: North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund, 2011

 “This is Destini

About the Advertisement:

This is Destini a 30-second spot that captures a snapshot of the life of a young woman named Destini. The spot introduces Destini, her puppy, shows us where she gets ready for school, and introduces her parents. It also tells us her father died from smoking, shows us how much she misses him. And then shares that her mother still smokes.

I particularly like “Destini,” which I presume is the young woman’s real name, because it creates layers of meaning in the spot. While it is her name, it also suggests that tobacco users may face the same “destiny.”

The advertisement leverages emotional appeals to drive home the point that tobacco use is harmful to one’s health.

Objective:

The goal of the advertisement is to discourage smoking by sharing a real-life example of the impact of smoking on one family. According to North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, this and other ads in the series have contributed to reducing teen smoking by 53,000 over the past nine years, which would suggest the campaign is working (NCDHHS Staff, 2017).

Target Market:

The target market for this spot is adolescents and teenagers who are likely to be pre-disposed to smoking.

Call to Action:

The call to action is subtle, stating “Tobacco. This is life.” thereby suggesting that smokers are apt to have a shorter life than non-smokers, and teens should not engage in the habit, or Destini’s reality may well be the destiny of all tobacco users.

Value Proposition:

Tobacco use can kill. Don’t use tobacco and potentially live a longer life.

Advertisement 4: Visit Florida, 2011

 “Aspirations

About the Advertisement:

This 30-second ad begins with somewhat cheesy post card-like pictures of outdoor activities in Florida fading in and out of the frame. We see people enjoying themselves in water activities, theme parks, and relaxing on the beach in each segment accompanied by some upbeat music. With roughly 7-seconds left in the spot, we hear a jolting car horn honk and the video changes to a young woman in the snow lost in thought while looking at a billboard for visitflorida.com.

The spot uses visualization and humor to help the viewer connect with the message.

Objective:

The purpose of the advertisement is to encourage viewers to think about Florida and all the fun activities in which individuals and families might engage. It would seem such advertisements are effective for the State of Florida. In 2016 the state saw over 100 million visitors from other states in the US and Canada (Visit Florida Staff, 2017)

Target Market:

The primary target market for this advertisement would appear to be individuals in colder climates who might be ready for a break from the cold weather. A secondary market might be any non-Florida resident desiring a beach or outdoor getaway.

Call to Action:

The call to action is, “Your Florida Side is coming…unleash it” and visit the website visitflorida.com to plan your next getaway.

Value Proposition:

Florida has everything you need to take a break from the drudgery of your life.

Advertisement 5: Wells Fargo, 2015

 “Why I Work” (Spanish) / “Souvenier” (English)

About the Advertisement:

This 30-second spot begins by showing a truck driver stopped along the road picking up a something. As the spot continues, we see he is picking up a rock. The visuals go on to show him stopping at various locations at different times of the day, each time picking up a rock. Then the spot cuts to a little girl sitting in the kitchen and we see the truck pull up in the window. The girl runs outside, and we learn that the girl is the truck driver’s daughter. She runs to meet him, and it’s clear they have missed each other. He gives her the rocks that he has picked up along the way, and she adds them to her collection, we see that each one is noted with the state from which he gathered it.

The spot has an emotional driver. It plays to the father’s absence while on the road and how much he and his daughter miss each other while he is away. But, as the announcer points out, while he’s on the road working, he’s also working together with Wells Fargo to help save for his daughter’s future geology degree.

Objective:

The goal of the commercial is apparently to build credibility for Wells Fargo as a valued banking partner to help the viewer save and build for the future.

Target Market:

Given the truck driver and his daughter are Hispanic, and the first version of this commercial was apparently released with a Spanish vocal track, and the rocks are all gathered from western states, it would appear that the primary target market is the growing Hispanic population within the United States. It may well be that Wells Fargo is seeking to reach the high percentage of unbanked Hispanics in the United States (Rojas, L.B., 2011). A secondary target might be immigrants in general.

Call to Action:

The call to action is for the viewer to contact Wells Fargo to begin building a stable financial future.

Value Proposition:

Wells Fargo is the bank that you need to achieve your goals.

 

Featured Vintage Image Source: Getty Images, Debroke/Classic Stock

References:

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Staff (2017). This is Tru. Retrieved April 1, 2017, from nc.gov: http://www.tru.nc.gov/

Rojas, L. B, (2011, September 8). Latinos and banking: Why they shy away, and why they shouldn’t. Retrieved April 1, 2017, from scpr.org: http://www.scpr.org/blogs/multiamerican/2011/09/08/7350/latino-immigrants-and-banking-why-they-shy-away-an/

Visit Florida Staff (2017). Research: 2016 Estimates of Visitors to Florida by Quarter. Retrieved April 1, 2017, from visitflorida.org: http://www.visitflorida.org/resources/research/

 

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