Inside the customer’s mind

July 28, 2003 Presentations Comments (0) 249

Inside the customer’s mind – A framework for creating profitable customer relationships

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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WHITEPAPER: Customers are Channel Neutral

July 15, 2003 Strategy, Whitepaper Comments (0) 323

Originally written in 2003 as a prediction for what would come to be known as “Omni-Channel marketing” during my tenure at the Jackson Group.
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From 2003:

The term “multi-channel marketing” refers to the process of building a customer relationship across two or more marketing or sales channels.The channels are those that are interactive, such as face-to-face, telephone, email, Internet, or perhaps direct mail. These channels provide an organization the opportunity to develop and maintain the brand promise as the customer engages the organization at each point of contact.

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The trouble with cellphones

May 1, 2003 Culture and demographics Comments (0) 312

In my travels lately, I’ve come to notice that people will use their cell phones anywhere to talk about anything. I’ve been privy to conversations about lawsuits, financial difficulties, and marital disputes, all thrown out in the open for any wandering ear to hear. It’s not that I’m trying to listen. I try to tune out other conversations, but it’s almost as if my ears (and I’m sure those of others) automatically tune in on words or phrases like, “lawsuit”, “…divorcing him”, “caught her in bed with…” or “I’m filing for bankruptcy”. I’m not trying to be nosy; my ears just can’t help themselves.

For a while, I was embarrassed when I inadvertently tuned in, but then I figured that it wasn’t my fault. If these people were not okay with having others overhear their conversations, they wouldn’t be having those conversations within listening distance of others.

This business of cellphones was the topic of a dinner conversation recently with my friend Roger. Roger has a theory that cell phones have replaced cigarettes as a nervous habit. People pull out their cell phones, call others when they feel bored or need to kill 5 minutes or so, and didn’t plan ahead with some reading material. It’s not that they’re conversations are meaningful when they do this. Most of these conversations, according to Roger, consist of such pleasantries as, “What are you doing? I’m just standing in line, waiting…”, or “Where are you? Oh. I’m in line waiting to buy movie tickets. Really? Which line? Oh, there you are…”

Roger may be on to something with this theory. In the airport the other day, while visiting the men’s room, I heard a cell phone ring and the guy in the stall next to me answered and said, “Hello? Oh, hi. I’m at the airport…just hanging around waiting for my flight…”.

I guess he just didn’t have anything to read.

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Marketing out of the box

April 17, 2003 Presentations Comments (0) 326

Marketing Out of the Box

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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Finance, fundraising and technology

April 5, 2003 Presentations Comments (0) 306

Finance, Fundraising and Technology: Beyond the Bottom Line

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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Improving the bottom line

December 11, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 258

Improving the bottom line: A case study in direct marketing list management

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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How to keep your job in marketing

September 12, 2002 Marketing Comments (0) 268

The notion that “Marketing isn’t Sales” is an old, but somewhat untrue statement in the real world. We marketers have learned the hard way that marketing’s number one priority is to drive revenue for the organization. I think we now realize that long-gone are the days when marketing produced pretty pictures, glossy brochures, gimmicky promotions and brand advertising that don’t drive short-term sales. Those days are but a memory for marketers–up in smoke like many of the firms that promoted such frivolity and spending with reckless abandon.

Today’s environment requires marketing that’s effective. And to be effective, marketing must improve the top-line with new sales, and the bottom-line by improving efficiencies in marketing operation. If marketing can’t do both–deliver a large number of qualified customers, in a cost effective manner–then doesn’t deliver tangible value to the organization.

In most organizations these days–regardless of if you’re selling to consumers or to businesses–marketing’s primary job is to support new sales in an anxious push for increased revenue. Certainly, driving new sales can generate new revenue. However, blindly focusing on acquisition can wreak havoc on an unprepared organization in terms of insufficient capacity to handle front-line sales or merchandising, sales fulfillment, customer service or technical support. Worst of all, with the organization concentrating on bringing in new customers in the front door, no one is watching the back door as existing customers stroll out. We would all agree, I think, that watching the back door is perhaps more important for long-term business success.

Balancing the organization’s desire for new customers with its desire for new revenue can be tricky. Somewhere, somehow, someone got the idea that new customers are better for producing revenue. While it may be true with some commodities, it’s largely an untrue generalization. The best source for new revenue is the existing customer…not the new ones. The challenge is that building business from existing customer is a relationship sell–something that’s longer term for the organization–and not something than usually can be leveraged to create an immediate impact on business revenue.

Relationship selling is what marketing is about, so changing a marketer’s mindset to focus...

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PRESENTATION: Piloting a CRM Initiative

July 23, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 160

Piloting a CRM Initiative: Balancing People Process and Technology

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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PRESENTATION: Developing a Continuity of Contact Program

July 22, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 186

Developing a Continuity of Contact Program

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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PRESENTATION: Updating your personal skill-set for CRM

May 21, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 167

Updating your skill-set for CRM: How to achieve personal success

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

Updating Your Personal Skillset

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