The trouble with cellphones

May 1, 2003 Culture and demographics Comments (0) 338

In my travels lately, I’ve come to notice that people will use their cell phones anywhere to talk about anything. I’ve been privy to conversations about lawsuits, financial difficulties, and marital disputes, all thrown out in the open for any wandering ear to hear. It’s not that I’m trying to listen. I try to tune out other conversations, but it’s almost as if my ears (and I’m sure those of others) automatically tune in on words or phrases like, “lawsuit”, “…divorcing him”, “caught her in bed with…” or “I’m filing for bankruptcy”. I’m not trying to be nosy; my ears just can’t help themselves.

For a while, I was embarrassed when I inadvertently tuned in, but then I figured that it wasn’t my fault. If these people were not okay with having others overhear their conversations, they wouldn’t be having those conversations within listening distance of others.

This business of cellphones was the topic of a dinner conversation recently with my friend Roger. Roger has a theory that cell phones have replaced cigarettes as a nervous habit. People pull out their cell phones, call others when they feel bored or need to kill 5 minutes or so, and didn’t plan ahead with some reading material. It’s not that they’re conversations are meaningful when they do this. Most of these conversations, according to Roger, consist of such pleasantries as, “What are you doing? I’m just standing in line, waiting…”, or “Where are you? Oh. I’m in line waiting to buy movie tickets. Really? Which line? Oh, there you are…”

Roger may be on to something with this theory. In the airport the other day, while visiting the men’s room, I heard a cell phone ring and the guy in the stall next to me answered and said, “Hello? Oh, hi. I’m at the airport…just hanging around waiting for my flight…”.

I guess he just didn’t have anything to read.

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Marketing out of the box

April 17, 2003 Presentations Comments (0) 353

Marketing Out of the Box

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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Finance, fundraising and technology

April 5, 2003 Presentations Comments (0) 336

Finance, Fundraising and Technology: Beyond the Bottom Line

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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Improving the bottom line

December 11, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 279

Improving the bottom line: A case study in direct marketing list management

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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How to keep your job in marketing

September 12, 2002 Marketing Comments (0) 296

The notion that “Marketing isn’t Sales” is an old, but somewhat untrue statement in the real world. We marketers have learned the hard way that marketing’s number one priority is to drive revenue for the organization. I think we now realize that long-gone are the days when marketing produced pretty pictures, glossy brochures, gimmicky promotions and brand advertising that don’t drive short-term sales. Those days are but a memory for marketers–up in smoke like many of the firms that promoted such frivolity and spending with reckless abandon.

Today’s environment requires marketing that’s effective. And to be effective, marketing must improve the top-line with new sales, and the bottom-line by improving efficiencies in marketing operation. If marketing can’t do both–deliver a large number of qualified customers, in a cost effective manner–then doesn’t deliver tangible value to the organization.

In most organizations these days–regardless of if you’re selling to consumers or to businesses–marketing’s primary job is to support new sales in an anxious push for increased revenue. Certainly, driving new sales can generate new revenue. However, blindly focusing on acquisition can wreak havoc on an unprepared organization in terms of insufficient capacity to handle front-line sales or merchandising, sales fulfillment, customer service or technical support. Worst of all, with the organization concentrating on bringing in new customers in the front door, no one is watching the back door as existing customers stroll out. We would all agree, I think, that watching the back door is perhaps more important for long-term business success.

Balancing the organization’s desire for new customers with its desire for new revenue can be tricky. Somewhere, somehow, someone got the idea that new customers are better for producing revenue. While it may be true with some commodities, it’s largely an untrue generalization. The best source for new revenue is the existing customer…not the new ones. The challenge is that building business from existing customer is a relationship sell–something that’s longer term for the organization–and not something than usually can be leveraged to create an immediate impact on business revenue.

Relationship selling is what marketing is about, so changing a marketer’s mindset to focus...

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PRESENTATION: Piloting a CRM Initiative

July 23, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 184

Piloting a CRM Initiative: Balancing People Process and Technology

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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PRESENTATION: Developing a Continuity of Contact Program

July 22, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 220

Developing a Continuity of Contact Program

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

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PRESENTATION: Updating your personal skill-set for CRM

May 21, 2002 Presentations Comments (0) 196

Updating your skill-set for CRM: How to achieve personal success

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs.

Updating Your Personal Skillset

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PRESENTATION: The Secret to Effective Data Stewardship

October 1, 2001 Presentations Comments (0) 234

The Secret to Effective Data Stewardship

Please note that this presentation is Dave Harkins’ work created in other partnerships or organizations and the design templates have not been changed. Additionally, this content may now be dated but can still be used as an idea starter for your specific needs. Continue Reading

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CRM: Management, Marketing or both?

September 1, 2001 Marketing Comments (0) 342

The acronym CRM is a confusing one. Many people say it stands for Customer Relationship Management, while others suggest Customer Relationship Marketing. Let’s take a look at how both of these acronyms are playing out.

Customer Relationship Management

In the mid-90’s while many of us were working on Marketing Information Systems (MkIS) to support focused customer strategies, most software and systems vendors were busy building and selling “Customer Relationship Management” software as a way to capitalize on the growing interest in the acronym “CRM.” Fueled primarily by this influx of CRM software and systems, most people began to accept that “CRM” stood for Customer Relationship Management, and began their attempts to manage relationships with customers. Most organizations taking this approach have found that their CRM initiatives have failed to live up to expectations–both financially and with stronger relationships with their customers.

CRM–as defined through systems and technology–relies heavily on customer data, information, buying patterns, and the like. It assumes we’re able to gain the data we need to do a better job of “managing” the customer’s needs, values and expectations with our business. However, customers don’t tell us everything and assuming they did, there are so many external factors that will influence a purchase decision or loyalty to the business, we could never hope to have databases large enough or powerful enough to allow us to manage relationships for any length of time with any sustainable success. We try anyway. As a result, most of us are data rich and information poor and have learned the hard way that CRM is not about systems and technology. High hopes that having more customer data would lead to more effective and targeted marketing programs that would lead to higher revenue for the company have been dashed. Simply capturing the data and trying to sell the customer more things doesn’t do a darn thing improve the relationship-a the fact that many have learned the hard way.

Customer Relationship Management is perhaps a misnomer. A better term for the systems and technology aspect might be Customer Information Management.

Customer Relationship Marketing

The term Customer Relationship Marketing–or the other CRM–seems...

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